Evaluation of the Exporting Quality Program under the Food for Progress initiative

Country

Dominican Republic

Region

Latin America & the Caribbean

Type

Evaluation Report

Year

2022

Evaluation of the Exporting Quality Program under the Food for Progress initiative

Country

Dominican Republic

Region

Latin America & the Caribbean

Type

Evaluation Report

Year

2022

Abstract:

The USDA FFPr Exporting Quality Program undergoes a comprehensive evaluation in this document, highlighting its impact and efficacy from September 2015 to December 2021. Managed by the International Executive Service Corps (IESC), this initiative strives to foster development and progress in the food sector. The Institute for Development Impact, with contributions from experts like Brian Foster, Molly Hageboeck, and Elizabeth Issac, has meticulously assessed the program’s trajectory, culminating in this final evaluation. The report delves into the program’s context, its alignment with desired outcomes, and offers insights into areas of improvement and success.

Description:

Under the broader umbrella of the Food for Progress initiative, the Exporting Quality Program plays a pivotal role in advancing food quality and standards. This evaluation, submitted in January 2022 and updated in February 2022, paints a detailed picture of the program’s journey over six years. Authored by the esteemed Institute for Development Impact, the report offers a deep dive into the program’s achievements, challenges, and future prospects. With a blend of quantitative and qualitative analyses, readers gain an understanding of the program’s impact on the ground and its broader implications for food security and development.

Related publications

Impact of Deforestation on Climate – Strategies for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Deforestation is a major driver of greenhouse gas emissions, contributing significantly to global climate change. This infographic, part of a series focused on agriculture’s role in greenhouse gas emissions, delves into the specific impacts of land use change and deforestation. It highlights the direct and indirect emissions caused by deforestation, including carbon dioxide from tree felling and methane from anaerobic fermentation. The infographic also presents key mitigation strategies, such as reforestation, afforestation, and sustainable forest management, emphasizing their potential to significantly reduce global greenhouse gas emissions by 2050.

Primary Sources of Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Dairy and Cattle Farming

This infographic provides a comprehensive analysis of the dairy and cattle industry’s contribution to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, highlighting major sources and potential mitigation strategies. Dairy farming, responsible for about 62% of total livestock emissions, produces significant amounts of methane, nitrous oxide, and carbon dioxide primarily through enteric fermentation, manure management, and feed production. Key strategies to reduce these emissions include improving feed and nutrition, selective breeding, enhancing animal health, and increasing productivity. The report underscores the potential to significantly reduce global GHG emissions from livestock by implementing these strategies, with a specific focus on reducing emissions per unit of milk and meat produced.

Contribution of Agriculture to Greenhouse Gas Emissions

The document titled “Contribution of Agriculture to Greenhouse Gas Emissions,” issued by the Institute for Development Impact, delves into the profound impact of agricultural activities on climate change. It investigates how practices such as crop production, livestock farming, and land use change contribute to the emission of greenhouse gasses. The report meticulously examines the specific drivers behind these emissions within the contexts of crop cultivation, livestock production, and land use patterns. Furthermore, it identifies regions that play significant roles in greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture. Notably, Asia emerges as a major contributor to agricultural greenhouse gasses, while Africa shows a notable increase in emissions from livestock over the past two decades, underscoring ongoing challenges even in low-income regions.

The report concludes by outlining strategic areas where emission reductions can be targeted, emphasizing the urgency and opportunity for mitigating the environmental impact of agricultural practices.

Subscribe

Enter your mail below to receive updates from Institute for Development Impact