Monitoring, Evaluation, Research and Learning

Explore I4DI’s publications portfolio. Committed to shared learning, continuous growth, and transparency, I4DI welcomes feedback and dialogue on any of our publications and reporting products.

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Performance indicators play a critical role in monitoring activity performance and
understanding its results. Disaggregating data – or separating it into subgroups – allows
users to understand nuances or trends within the data. This USAID/RFS Good Practice MEL Note provides USAID staff and partners with specific guidance on Agency required disaggregations such as sex dissagregations, as well as good practices and helpful tips to consider when determining which disaggregates to use and how to apply them.

USAID policy requires baseline data for each of their performance monitoring indicators, but USAID staff and partners often struggle to determine the most appropriate baseline and the best mechanism to establish that baseline. This USAID/RFS Good Practice MEL Note provides USAID staff and partners with specific guidance on what good baselines look like and how to establish them. It walks the user through several common baseline setting scenarios, including examples from RFS-funded activities, as well as helpful tips for establishing performance indicator baselines.

Logic models serve as a potent visual representation of a Theory of Change (ToC), encompassing various forms such as Results Frameworks, results chains, and Logical Frameworks. While not a stringent requirement by USAID at the activity level, the integration of a ToC and logic model in an Activity Monitoring and Evaluation Plan (AMELP) is fervently recommended. This guidance note, part of the RFS Good Practice MEL Notes series, elucidates the alignment of these models with the stated objectives of an activity, set within a particular context. It accentuates the coherence between components of the Activity MEL Plan and the ToC, fostering a comprehensive understanding of development paradigms.

The Women + Water Alliance is a global development alliance (GDA) between USAID and Gap Inc. and its partners, CARE, Water.org, WaterAid, the Institute for Sustainable Communities (ISC), International Center for Research on Women (ICRW) and the Institute for Development Impact. This infographic developed by I4DI outlines the key outcomes of the activities of the Women + Water alliance in relation to women’s agency and self efficacy. Women’s empowerment improved among direct P.A.C.E. participants but not among the broader community and women’s engagement in community water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) planning in the intensive WaterAid communities resulted in meaningful improvements to WASH management.

The Women + Water Alliance is a global development alliance (GDA) between USAID and Gap Inc. and its partners, CARE, Water.org, WaterAid, the Institute for Sustainable Communities (ISC), International Center for Research on Women (ICRW) and the Institute for Development Impact. This infographic developed by I4DI outlines the key outcomes of the activities of the Women + Water alliance in relation to the Water Burden in Maharashtra and Madhya Pradesh. Overall, the burden of water fetching decreased, and responsibilities shifted in many households. Reduced time for water collection also had positive impact on households including increased time for income generation.